THINK International Women’s Day

First of all, what is International Women’s Day?  A quote
taken from the official website states,
“International Women’s Day (8 March) is a global day celebrating
the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and
future.  In some places like China, Russia, Vietnam and Bulgaria,
International Women’s Day is a national holiday.”
Here at Think Global Recruitment, we love to get involved with
as many international days as possible!  Because International Women’s Day
falls on a Sunday, we will be celebrating on Monday 9th with all of
the men in our office looking after us ladies! 
We’ve been conducting a spot of research to see how other
countries around the world celebrate.  Though traditions are very similar
in some places, we thought we would share our findings! 
Armenia
The Eurasian country that borders the likes of Georgia,
Azerbaijan, Turkey and Iran was officially guaranteed gender equality in
1991.  Since then, women are now, actively participating in entertainment,
politics and working life.
Instead of International Women’s Day, the Armenians celebrate ‘Women’s
Month’
(the celebration of beauty and motherhood).  During this time,
problems that concern women are given special attention, events and activities
are organised for women, there are special shop discounts and most women even
get a bunch of flowers a day!  A few years ago, the women of Armenia were
given free gynaecological and surgical services for the full month!
Russia
International Women’s Day is widely celebrated throughout
Russia, in fact, many businesses close for the day and women are given the day
off work.  The day usually involves a festive meal and drinks along with
television programs that pay tribute to famous Russian women that have achieved
great things.
Men and their children usually spend a long time queuing on the
morning of March 8th so that they can buy their loved ones
flowers.  Postcards with pictures of women with children are often given
out on this day.  The day was introduced in Russia after a protest in St
Petersburg for women’s right to vote in 1913.
China
Instead of celebrating the day for women’s achievements, it is a
day for men to show their appreciation for women and express their love. 
Women’s day is seen very much the same as Mother’s Day or Valentine’s Day in
China.
Women are given the full day or a half day off work, with their
employers often buying gifts, one of the most popular is cinema tickets! 
Men tend to buy gifts for their wives, children and any other ladies in their
lives.
Interestingly, Girl’s Day is also celebrated in China, this is held
on the 7th of March and was introduced by university students. 
The day is in place for the single women in China – the term ‘woman’ is
generally associated with someone who is married.  The universities hold
all sorts of events on this day (make up / dancing competitions). 
Additionally, there is the tradition of a ‘wishing tree’ where the girls
are encouraged to attach cards with their written wishes.
Poland
It is quite common in Poland for women to demonstrate in some of
the bigger cities.  However, they usually receive the special gift of a
carnation and quite commonly, a pair of stockings!
Taiwan
Taiwan sees International Women’s Day as a huge occasion, there
are public tributes to the Ten Outstanding Young Women of the Year and Dimond
Lady Awards
.  The achievements of women are celebrated widely across
Taiwan.
On the flip-side, the government release an annual survey on
March 8th on women’s waist sizes and warnings on how weight gain may
pose a danger to their health!
We would be here until March 8th next year if we even
attempted to cover all of the countries around the globe.  Though it is an
international day, there are still quite a few countries that don’t take part
in International Women’s Day.  Here at Think Global Recruitment, we think
it’s incredible the achievements that women have made over the past 100
years.  And we can’t wait to be treated by all of the men in the office on
Monday!
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